Diving into d·HEALTH Barcelona

Clinical immersion: my experience Respect, integration, passion, exclusivity, fortunate, challenging, social, humane, team-working, eye-opening, inspiring, touchy, interesting, uncertainty, initiative, divergent, intuition, enthusiastic, team-building, agent of change, disruptive, enhancer, empathy, motivation, entrepreneur, development, next generation, learn, enjoy, future… It is not … Continue reading

We need education that focus on problem solving and innovation

In order for our global society to develop solutions to pressing problems in an increasingly technology-driven and constantly changing world, we need to re-train our workforce to do what machines can’t: to be enterprising, independent and strategic thinkers—to be purposeful creators.

These starts with changing the way students, especially the youngest ones, learn. And learning in the future has a lot to do with play.

Learning through play with “hands-on, minds-on” approaches is a powerful way forward. Play gives children space to dream, discover, improvise, and challenge convention. It’s crucial to social, emotional, cognitive and even physical development, helping them grow up “better adjusted, smarter and less stressed.”

However, today’s youngsters have a deficit of play. Where did play go? And can we get it back?

This was one of the topics of the LEGO Idea Conference that took place last April in Denmark. Hosted by the LEGO Foundation, the conference aimed at creating and being a part of “conversations and networks around re-defining play and re-imagining learning.” Speakers included leading voices in education, learning, and child development such as Tony Wagner. He talked about the importance of disciplined play in an innovation economy. The important message of his keynote was: “The capacity of being a creative problem solver is within the human being”. We, at Moebio, agree with Wagner’s words and our goal at Design Health Barcelona, our flagship program, is to create future leaders in healthcare innovation by guiding talented people beyond their boundaries, bringing their creativity and entrepreneurial mind out and providing them new knowledge and skills to succeed.

You can watch Wagner’s inspiring TED-style keynote in the following video. ¡Enjoy!

Where can I find money?

Young entrepreneurs are defined by their fresh, exciting ideas and passionate drive to succeed. Most, however, lack money and the experience and connections to turn their concepts into viable businesses. So how do young startups land funding? The answer seems to be: any which way they can.

Kauffmann has published a series of ebooks featuring practical advice from healthcare entrepreneurs. The one posted bellow includes insights on early-stage fundraising based on the pitfalls, options and the feedback of experienced entrepreneurs in the field.

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Greatest medical devices of all time… since now

The hard-working health care professionals we have today get a lot of help from amazing medical devices. The doctors, nurses and others from more than a century ago — and especially those from more than two centuries ago — would be amazed at the things that we can do in health care today. No matter your health care specialty, you have probably benefited from medical innovations.

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Credit: QMED

Recently Qmed surveyed its audience about their thoughts on what are the most important medical devices ever developed. At the top it was the hypodermic syringe. Along with the myriad of substances for which they are the prime, if not the only, delivery vehicle, have probably been responsible for saving more lives and alleviating more suffering than any other piece of medical technology. Completed the list the pacemaker, the eyeglasses, the X-ray machine, the MRI, the stethoscope, the band-aid, the catheter, the CT Scanner, the cochlear implant, the intraocular lenses and the heart valves.

Innovation within the medical device industry had led to tremendous advances in the provision of care for patients worldwide. But it is a process that needs to continue.

Our mission in Design Health Barcelona (d·HEALTH Barcelona) program is to train the next generation of healthcare innovators, the ones that will invent and implement the new biomedical products, through the biodesign process, a systematic approach based on unmet needs finding to later increase our ability to diagnose and treat conditions.

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d·HEALTH Barcelona 2013-2014 fellows

We are currently seeking the fellows for d·HEALTH Barcelona 2014-2015. Worldwide youngsters with interest in the development of medical technologies and with advanced degrees in engineering, design, business or life sciences are encouraged to apply before May 11, 2014.

We offer the fellows a once-in-a-life-time experience, first hand access to real-world experts from the medical technology, legal and venture capital sectors worldwide and a fun learning/working environment while they join an emerging field.

d·HEALTH Barcelona 2013-2014 fellows are currently prototyping their innovations. Will one of them join, in the future, the list of greatest medical devices ever? Or will be yours, future fellow reading this post? Only time will tell. Meantime, if you want to get more info about the application process or, even better, apply and become a member of our red polo shirts team, click here.

The Global Health Innovation Guidebook

If you are interested in developing products or services to address global health needs, congratulations! A great adventure awaits you. Most people who commit themselves to a path in global health find the work inspiring and rewarding, especially when they help bring about real, lasting impact. However, they also report that their quest can be frustrating and all-consuming, with no guarantee of a successful passage.

Last week, Stanford University published, online and free, the Global Health Innovation Guidebook, a bright, easy-to-read and substantive guide for students working on health problems. It includes insights and lessons to help innovators succeed on their journey from an idea to the implementation of a health solution.

You can download this must read book for anyone pursuing the process of entrepreneurship in healthcare just clicking on the file below.

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Apple’s plans to redefine mobile health

The lure of wearable technology and its application to health is tremendous. So tremendous that even the richest company on the planet, Apple, can’t resist it.

The company’s interest in healthcare and fitness tracking will be displayed in an iOS 8 application codenamed Healthbook capable of tracking several different health and fitness data points. Which data will the app monitor it is not clear but over the last weeks, speculation and mockups have intensified. Some say it will track bloodwork, heart rate, hydration, blood pressure, physical activity, nutrition, blood sugar, sleep, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and weight.

Healthbook will read health and fitness data from wearable devices such as the iWatch Apple is also developing. The smart watch will serve as an accessory to the iPhone and other iOS devices, giving users easy at-a-glance access to common functions without having to take their larger devices out of their pockets or bags. It will also incorporate a number of sensors and biometrics. Rumors have suggested that the iWatch could also serve as a control device for home automation and there are reports suggesting it could come in multiple sizes for a customized fit.

Getting the “iWatch” and this app into the hands of consumers may take some time. Apple is not only on its own timetable for this product, but it will likely need to follow the schedules of governments. The company has begun meeting with the FDA regarding medical applications and last February was seeking people to test health related software.

Seven years out from the revolutionary iPhone’s introduction, Apple’s entry into the health and sensor world is not a matter of if it will happen, but it comes down to how long it will take for the company to implement its vision of reinventing mobile healthcare.

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Recreation of a screenshots of the Healthbook. Credit: 9to5mac.com

 

A collection of worth watching videos

This week we have found quite a few fascinating videos on the Internet.

First, the World Economic Forum has made public a collection of videos summarizing the lectures that took place this year at Davos. They examine ideas such as self monitoring with digital health, how can robotics and assistive technology help us to live well in later life or how can we improve the access and affordability of simple medical devices for people living in rural areas on less than four dollars a day. But also how big data is redesigning how we learn, how to empower new talent and breakthroughs in different scientific fields.

The video below is about product innovation for emerging markets but you can access the complete collection here. It is, definitely worth watching!

It is also highly recommend to visit the Center for Integration of Medicine & Innovative Tecnology (CIMIT)’s video gallery. There you will also find amazing videos about innovations in healthcare, including the next technology wave in the sector as well as reorganization of healthcare delivery and how to detect unmet needs to later develop new solutions. We have highlighted one about the importance of routine simulation in modern healthcare but all of them are available here.

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Now is health entrepreneurs’ time.

Are we living in the best time in history to be a healthcare entrepreneur? An increasing number of experts say yes. The last one, Zen Chu, the founder of HackingMedicine and the current Entrepreneur in Residence at MIT. In an article published last week he explains what makes current times the most exciting ones to start a new business in healthcare:

  • Broad realization that technology can be used to scale medicine at a broader systems + population health
  • Changing healthcare reforms in the US is aligning incentives for better systemic healthcare
  • Large entrenched healthcare institutions are having a tough time adapting versus more agile startups
  • Start up costs have plummeted, so it’s more capital efficient than ever
  • The ubiquity of mobile computing and low cost diagnostics and sensors make health data liquidity and tracking easier than ever
  • Rising middle classes and health infrastructure in emerging economies are expanding access and demand globally

Chu’s article is one of the gems we have found on the Internet this week but not the only one. The slideshare below includes the top 10 technology and business model changes poised to disrupt the medical technology industry. It is worth having a look to it.

An intense start: the lives of the fellows during the bootcamp

Last September, Design Health Barcelona fellows started their journey in healthcare entrepreneurship with a trip by bus to Collbató, a small town next to Montserrat, one of the most famous and beautiful natural landscapes in Catalunya. There, the 12 fellows lived for a week, knowing each other, sharing breakfast, lunch, dinner, leisure time, the first lessons and, above all, future dreams and ambitions.

That week marked the beginning of the bootcamp stage, a four weeks long stage in which fellows attended over 150 hours of lectures on fields essential to develop medical technology.

The video below summarizes the experiences of our fellows during their first month as future innovators in just five minutes! It is beautiful! Enjoy it!

What should the vision for tomorrow’s health care be?

Making accurate long-term predictions about health care is far from easy. After all, advances such as robotics-aided surgery and stem-cell research weren’t routinely available to doctors as recently as the early 1990s; moreover, they weren’t even using e-mail back then. Projecting how the medical landscape might look like, for example, in 2025, is equally difficult.

However, we can explore what key attributes future health care delivery systems should have. That is what Rob Lazerow, Practice Manager at Health Care Advisory Board did last October at a conference in Washington DC with providers, policy makers and community leaders. The following are the 7 words he selected to describe how tomorrow’s healthcare should look like. A great selection according to us. What do you think? Do you find missing any?

1. Scalable. The future delivery system will provide care through scalable, efficient models by managing three different patient populations. Achieving a flexible delivery model will become even more critical if coverage expansion efforts reveal new access gaps.

2. Team-based. As part of achieving scale, providers will increasingly deploy team-based care models—especially for primary care. The medical home and similar models ensure all providers practice to the full extent of their training and skills.

3. Patient-centered. While “patient-centered care” is a buzzword right now, providers need to reflect on what it actually means. At a minimum, providers will need to develop specific care plans that support patients’ holistic health needs. Progressive organizations will go further and reorganize around patient needs, instead of specialties or academic disciplines.

4. Comprehensive. Leading population health managers already recognize how much behavioral health, economic stability (especially housing), and emotional support contribute to overall health and wellbeing. In the future, providers will have a large role to play in addressing these psychosocial determinants of health.

5. Collaborative. Delivering comprehensive care will require an array of services, many of which extend beyond the traditional purview of health care providers. Partnership management must be a core competency to coordinate networks of partners with aligned objectives.

6. Interconnected. Effectively managing a network of hospitals, physicians, post-acute care providers, and community organizations will require a new level of interconnectivity. Many provider organizations have ended the quest for the perfect EMR system and instead are focusing on data exchange across their networks.

7. Inclusive. Finally, the future delivery system will be much more inclusive than today’s health care system. It begins with the partnerships that will make care more collaborative, but does not stop with formal providers or community organizations. In the future, patients, family members, and lay caregivers will be more directly involved in both care planning and delivery.