Diving into d·HEALTH Barcelona

Clinical immersion: my experience Respect, integration, passion, exclusivity, fortunate, challenging, social, humane, team-working, eye-opening, inspiring, touchy, interesting, uncertainty, initiative, divergent, intuition, enthusiastic, team-building, agent of change, disruptive, enhancer, empathy, motivation, entrepreneur, development, next generation, learn, enjoy, future… It is not … Continue reading

Findings needs to improve healthcare

There’s a quiet revolution going on in the field of medical device innovation across the world led by people who are creating affordable and elegantly designed devices that add value to existing medical processes and make them simpler, cheaper and more accessible.

To create those products, these change-makers first have to identify unmet medical needs within a clinical setting and then develop new business opportunities.

The 2013-2014 d·HEALTH fellow teams have ended their clinical immersion experience in neonatology, neuro-rehabilitation and arrhythmias. During two months of intensive observation on medical procedures and routines, each team has compiled a list of over 300 needs and currently they are in the process of narrowing these large lists down into the top needs to take forward into brainstorming and invention.

This video resumes how was their clinical immersion experience at three top hospitals in Barcelona.

Neonatology Team includes: Arnau Valls, Marc Rabaza, Susan Feitoza and Mattia Bosio

Neuro-rehabilitation Team includes: Markus Wilhelms, Immaculada Herrero, Àngel Calzada and Marc Benet

Arrhythmias Team includes: Lalis Fontcuberta, Mateu Pla, Roger Benet and Alfred Ramírez

We can train you, but we can’t change your DNA!

Google is famous for having spent years hiring people focusing on GPAs, brand name schools and interview brain teasers. In a recent article at The New York Times, Google’s head of people operations, Laszlo Bock, detailed what the company looks for now. And increasingly, it is not about credentials.

Succeeding in academia or having studied at a prestigious university isn’t always a sign of being able to do a job. However, intellectual humility, i.e., the ability to step back and embrace other people’s ideas it is a sign of open-mindedness that allows people to learn.

The great fallacy of the Information and Knowledge Society is that what matters is knowledge. It’s not true. The key assets are skills. Skills are what transform knowledge into something of value. To excel in tomorrow’s job market, those who think better and have the skills to use their knowledge to the best possible use, in different contexts and with different goals, enjoy a competitive advantage over those who don’t.

Coding, creating a business plan, prototyping… all of them can be taught. How to be optimistic, to have a “glass half-full mentality”, to stay motivated, feel passionate, be very patient and very persistent to face the challenges of entrepreneurship not. The latter is the kind of people we seek for Design Health Barcelona, people who want to create and drive their own future. Because, as Herb Kelleher, the successful entrepreneur co-founder and former CEO of Southwest Airlines once said:

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A collection of worth watching videos

This week we have found quite a few fascinating videos on the Internet.

First, the World Economic Forum has made public a collection of videos summarizing the lectures that took place this year at Davos. They examine ideas such as self monitoring with digital health, how can robotics and assistive technology help us to live well in later life or how can we improve the access and affordability of simple medical devices for people living in rural areas on less than four dollars a day. But also how big data is redesigning how we learn, how to empower new talent and breakthroughs in different scientific fields.

The video below is about product innovation for emerging markets but you can access the complete collection here. It is, definitely worth watching!

It is also highly recommend to visit the Center for Integration of Medicine & Innovative Tecnology (CIMIT)’s video gallery. There you will also find amazing videos about innovations in healthcare, including the next technology wave in the sector as well as reorganization of healthcare delivery and how to detect unmet needs to later develop new solutions. We have highlighted one about the importance of routine simulation in modern healthcare but all of them are available here.

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Now is health entrepreneurs’ time.

Are we living in the best time in history to be a healthcare entrepreneur? An increasing number of experts say yes. The last one, Zen Chu, the founder of HackingMedicine and the current Entrepreneur in Residence at MIT. In an article published last week he explains what makes current times the most exciting ones to start a new business in healthcare:

  • Broad realization that technology can be used to scale medicine at a broader systems + population health
  • Changing healthcare reforms in the US is aligning incentives for better systemic healthcare
  • Large entrenched healthcare institutions are having a tough time adapting versus more agile startups
  • Start up costs have plummeted, so it’s more capital efficient than ever
  • The ubiquity of mobile computing and low cost diagnostics and sensors make health data liquidity and tracking easier than ever
  • Rising middle classes and health infrastructure in emerging economies are expanding access and demand globally

Chu’s article is one of the gems we have found on the Internet this week but not the only one. The slideshare below includes the top 10 technology and business model changes poised to disrupt the medical technology industry. It is worth having a look to it.

Victor McCray’s recipe to reduce risk in business

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Credit: Ocular Dynamics

Every business venture, regardless of economic climate, market conditions, products, personnel and capitalization, has risks. Assessing those risks is the first step to later start taking measures to reduce them.

Victor McCray has plenty of experience managing risks and he shared it with Design Health Barcelona fellows at a recent videoconference.

Victor is a prominent figure in medtech, both a physician and an entrepreneur. As CEO and Co-Founder of Ocular Dynamics, a Silicon Valley based company developing a polymer contact lens coating for patients with dry eye disease, McCray knows what he is talking about, and fellows took full advantage of their time with him, covering a wide range of topics. If you keep reading here you will also learn Victor’s secret to manage entrepreneurial risk.

 

Entrepreneurship in Spain: state of the art (by two d·HEALTH Barcelona Faculty members)

Launching a new enterprise has always been a hit-or-miss proposition. According to the decades-old formula, you write a business plan, pitch it to investors, assemble a team, introduce a product, and start selling as hard as you can. And somewhere in this sequence of events, you’ll probably suffer a fatal setback. 75% of all start-ups fail.

Recently an important countervailing force has emerged, one that can make the process of starting a company less risky. The “lean start-up,” methodology favors experimentation over elaborate planning, customer feedback over intuition, and iterative design over traditional “big design up front” development. Although the methodology is just a few years old, its concepts have quickly taken root in the start-up world, and business schools have already begun adapting their curricula to teach them.

The lean start-up movement hasn’t gone totally mainstream, however, and we have yet to feel its full impact. Design Health Barcelona Faculty member Mario López de Ávila (@nodosenlared) has published a report featuring the state of the art of Lean Start-Up entrepreneurship in Spain. The document, accessible here, includes chapters about central aspects of the Lean Startup approach such as prototyping, experiments, metrics and business models. The latter has been written by Design Health Faculty member Javier Megias (@jmegias), who has recently given a lot to talk about after publishing the Spain Start Up Map, an excellent infographic that includes the Spanish startup and investor community.

Congratulations to both of them!

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Credit: Start-Up Map (by Javier Megías -@jmegias)

 

An intense start: the lives of the fellows during the bootcamp

Last September, Design Health Barcelona fellows started their journey in healthcare entrepreneurship with a trip by bus to Collbató, a small town next to Montserrat, one of the most famous and beautiful natural landscapes in Catalunya. There, the 12 fellows lived for a week, knowing each other, sharing breakfast, lunch, dinner, leisure time, the first lessons and, above all, future dreams and ambitions.

That week marked the beginning of the bootcamp stage, a four weeks long stage in which fellows attended over 150 hours of lectures on fields essential to develop medical technology.

The video below summarizes the experiences of our fellows during their first month as future innovators in just five minutes! It is beautiful! Enjoy it!

7 very useful videos for every entrepreneur

In 2013 the Lean Startup movement has continued growing and created a very visible community interested in using its principles. In the conference held in San Francisco December 9-11 about the Lean methodology, some of its best practitioners spoke about emerging strategies that maturing companies have tested to keep innovation at the core of their businesses, unexpected challenges faced by entrepreneurs implementing Lean Startup practices around the world and the particular opportunities for Lean Impact among non-profit and mission-driven organizations. Here are 7 video-highlights collected by The Fetch Blog of the conference and very useful for every entrepreneur.

Learning to be an organization that pivots (by @keyajay)

Frame Before You Build, Measure, Learn (by @zachnies)

Using Kickstarter to Run an MVP (by @VelezAlejandro)

The Medium Is the Message (by @pv)

Risk, Information, Time and Money (by @danmil)

Acquiring Your First Users Out of Thin Air (by @kmin)

Evidence-based Entrepreneurship (by @sgblank)

The Secret of Great Teams

There are teams that have changed the world. The designers of the Mac, the creators of Google, the most popular site on the Web, Henry Ford’s team who made the automobile affordable, the agency that came up with Mastercard’s “priceless” campaign that has become a cliché…

Building companies and making business history, requires the know-how to build long-lasting, harmonic, cooperative, synchronized teams. Great teams are more than just a gathering of smart people. To build a great team requires the ability to master the “art of people” and knowing how to maneuver hundreds (if not thousands) of people at the right place and at the right time. It means knowing how each person thinks and how to best utilize their competencies rightly at all times.

To build a high-functioning team it’s difficult, but it can be learned. During the first week of the bootcamp stage, Simon Kavanagh and Jon Tangen, from Danish KaosPilot school trained Design Health Barcelona fellows on how to create successful teams. In this interview, they share with us some of the techniques and methodologies used.